Advanced search

Message boards : Image and Video Discussion : Researcher hide the nest

Author Message
Michal Kindura
Send message
Joined: 28 Apr 13
Posts: 123
Combined Credit: 81,669,569
DNA@Home: 253,257
SubsetSum@Home: 1,127,118
Wildlife@Home: 80,289,195
Wildlife@Home Watched: 38,247,903s
Wildlife@Home Events: 12,091
Climate Tweets: 4
Images Observed: 3,195

            
Message 5810 - Posted: 25 Aug 2015, 1:17:30 UTC

I would like to discuss the event between 00:03:54 (approximately 2015-05-20 13:48:51) and 00:04:13 (approximately 2015-05-20 13:49:10).



Is it necessary? The nest is not visible before that. Worse after. Why he covered nest with grass?

Grouse researchers usually do opposite thing - pluck grass, for better cam view.

BTW, this is one of the worst nests. A few hours ago, nest is not visible too, It took me several hours for correction. At first time, I was thinking that the bird is still on nest. I corrected 5 next videos later (in review page), because I mark it as "on nest". (This is note for JumpinJohnny, DoctorNow, ecologyfund,... I hope that I save your hours of rewatching and analysis of this nest :) )

#101305


My comment: The bird leaves the nest @09:59:18. The bird will NOT return to the nest check by scientist @13:43:12.

Profile JumpinJohnny
Avatar
Send message
Joined: 24 Sep 13
Posts: 237
Combined Credit: 10,275,610
DNA@Home: 192,548
SubsetSum@Home: 201,740
Wildlife@Home: 9,881,323
Wildlife@Home Watched: 55,997,833s
Wildlife@Home Events: 15,584
Climate Tweets: 333
Images Observed: 351

              
Message 5811 - Posted: 25 Aug 2015, 1:36:11 UTC - in response to Message 5810.
Last modified: 25 Aug 2015, 1:37:54 UTC

I somewhat remember this nest. I think it was predated or maybe the hen was attacked by a raptor??? and the researcher was checking to see what was left of the eggs.

I'll check it later to be certain we have Event agreement.

edit: I'll have some time in mid September to watch a few mor vids.
____________

Michal Kindura
Send message
Joined: 28 Apr 13
Posts: 123
Combined Credit: 81,669,569
DNA@Home: 253,257
SubsetSum@Home: 1,127,118
Wildlife@Home: 80,289,195
Wildlife@Home Watched: 38,247,903s
Wildlife@Home Events: 12,091
Climate Tweets: 4
Images Observed: 3,195

            
Message 5812 - Posted: 25 Aug 2015, 2:48:28 UTC - in response to Message 5811.

I somewhat remember this nest. I think it was predated or maybe the hen was attacked by a raptor??? and the researcher was checking to see what was left of the eggs.

I'll check it later to be certain we have Event agreement.

edit: I'll have some time in mid September to watch a few mor vids.

Yes, badger

first time:

next video


and later

and again

...again

Profile DoctorNow
Avatar
Send message
Joined: 31 Jan 12
Posts: 328
Combined Credit: 2,333,912
DNA@Home: 94,617
SubsetSum@Home: 162,940
Wildlife@Home: 2,076,355
Wildlife@Home Watched: 1,977,485s
Wildlife@Home Events: 589
Climate Tweets: 128
Images Observed: 2,678

              
Message 5814 - Posted: 25 Aug 2015, 6:57:14 UTC - in response to Message 5810.

BTW, this is one of the worst nests. A few hours ago, nest is not visible too, It took me several hours for correction. At first time, I was thinking that the bird is still on nest. I corrected 5 next videos later (in review page), because I mark it as "on nest". (This is note for JumpinJohnny, DoctorNow, ecologyfund,... I hope that I save your hours of rewatching and analysis of this nest :) )

Luckily I didn't have much of this videos yet (and couldn't watch much the last days anyway), and the ones I got were rather easy because I got the ones were the badger plunders the nest - it was the first time at all I got videos with a predator. I was so happy... :-D ;-)
Anyway, I find it somewhat curious that all of the teal nests are hard covered. Either this bird is searching for such places or it is intention to make us a hard time. ;-)
____________
Wildlife & SubsetSum Badges-creator ;-)
Mod/Guru @ the german team BOINC@Heidelberg
My BOINC-Stats / My Badges

Michal Kindura
Send message
Joined: 28 Apr 13
Posts: 123
Combined Credit: 81,669,569
DNA@Home: 253,257
SubsetSum@Home: 1,127,118
Wildlife@Home: 80,289,195
Wildlife@Home Watched: 38,247,903s
Wildlife@Home Events: 12,091
Climate Tweets: 4
Images Observed: 3,195

            
Message 5815 - Posted: 25 Aug 2015, 13:47:54 UTC

Another difficult video If you viewed at 10x speed. Bird left. Badget at left edge of screen.


from left @17:51:06

Becca Eckroad
Volunteer moderator
Project administrator
Project developer
Project tester
Project scientist
Send message
Joined: 26 Oct 12
Posts: 59
Combined Credit: 0
DNA@Home: 0
SubsetSum@Home: 0
Wildlife@Home: 0
Wildlife@Home Watched: 81,289s
Wildlife@Home Events: 0
Climate Tweets: 0
Images Observed: 0

  
Message 5817 - Posted: 25 Aug 2015, 19:10:28 UTC

A little background on why researchers cover duck nests: Hens like to cover nests when they leave for regular recesses. This helps camouflage the eggs AND prevents them from getting too hot (hard boiled eggs anyone?).These hens are also kind of sneaky. If they sense a predator nearby, they will quickly cover their nests and WALK away from the nest, not fly. We saw this happen one day when we were dragging for nests. We slowed down our ATV's to turn around, and the DU biologist with us pointed out a hen walking away from her nest.

Because covering the nest is a natural behavior for these birds, researchers also cover nests after they are finished at the nest bowl.

Michal Kindura
Send message
Joined: 28 Apr 13
Posts: 123
Combined Credit: 81,669,569
DNA@Home: 253,257
SubsetSum@Home: 1,127,118
Wildlife@Home: 80,289,195
Wildlife@Home Watched: 38,247,903s
Wildlife@Home Events: 12,091
Climate Tweets: 4
Images Observed: 3,195

            
Message 5818 - Posted: 25 Aug 2015, 20:29:35 UTC - in response to Message 5817.

Thank you for your response Becca.

We need to see the nest (brooding chicks etc.). Birds need to have covered nest... What do you think about different type of camera installation? The camera is close to the ground. Maybe we could see more if the camera was on the rod, up, above the terrain.

Visualization of this cam:


It could be better:


Is it possible?

Susan Felege
Volunteer moderator
Project administrator
Project developer
Project tester
Project scientist
Send message
Joined: 11 Oct 12
Posts: 66
Combined Credit: 0
DNA@Home: 0
SubsetSum@Home: 0
Wildlife@Home: 0
Wildlife@Home Watched: 180s
Wildlife@Home Events: 0
Climate Tweets: 0
Images Observed: 350

  
Message 5847 - Posted: 2 Sep 2015, 15:43:54 UTC

We do have the cameras on posts, but we don't want them to tower too high above nest and ultimately the vegetation so they are easy for predators to locate and target the nest. In order to be minimally invasive at the nests, we try to place cameras to see birds coming and going and of course predators entering the scene, but in a way that hides the camera with the surrounding vegetation without too much alteration of it. As a result, some are much easier to see into the nest bowl while others are a bit tougher. It is really tough for us to balance the highest quality viewing without comprising the success of the nest! I appreciate your patience on some of these nests where it is tough to determine what is really going on in the nest.

Michal Kindura
Send message
Joined: 28 Apr 13
Posts: 123
Combined Credit: 81,669,569
DNA@Home: 253,257
SubsetSum@Home: 1,127,118
Wildlife@Home: 80,289,195
Wildlife@Home Watched: 38,247,903s
Wildlife@Home Events: 12,091
Climate Tweets: 4
Images Observed: 3,195

            
Message 5850 - Posted: 2 Sep 2015, 21:25:30 UTC - in response to Message 5847.

Thank you.

Another idea...Do you plan to use a thermocamera? It could facilitate the identification in vegetation. There is no need for continuous recording, just photos, as part of the hardest videos (nests).


Post to thread

Message boards : Image and Video Discussion : Researcher hide the nest